Friday, April 22, 2005

Missing THE POINT

By Anonymous

I think, therefore I am not. Just kidding. Actually, I don’t think, therefore I am. Just kidding. I think that much of this blog, as useful and perhaps even necessary as it is, is missing the point. It is undeniably true, though that never stops volumes of denial, that the pathological manifestations of Mr. Cohen and the deep suffering of many of his temporarily willing enablers, need to be addressed, processed, brought to some kind of balance, yes. It is also true, at least if one subscribes to the wisdom of Gurdjieff, that all issues of the well being of the individual, as vital to health and harmony as they may be, are secondary to the issues of the well being of the Work as a whole. So this means that, perhaps, the most damaging effects of this whole mess, of Mr. Cohen’s predictable fall from grace, is the complete disillusionment that his behavior creates in so many good, decent and serious practitioners, disillusionment relative to the path itself. Of course it is human tendency to assume all spiritual teachers are bad, are psychotic, just because of the prominence of so many public scandals. When one is disillusioned by his or her teacher, yes, often one must come to terms with both one’s grief and remorse and also with their own naiveté, confusion, false expectations and projections, transference and dependencies, but these things can be resolved with competent help and a healing and nurturing environment. But when one’s disillusionment severs them from the Path itself, from all true self-inquiry and transformational possibilities, that is the greater tragedy.

There is such a thing as true crazy wisdom, but that term has been so misused, both by those who totally trivialize it, assuming every circus clown and stand-up comic is practicing it (at least this is benign), and by those who excuse what should be inexcusable abuses toward others, cruelty, sadism, and related neuroses, by calling it crazy wisdom (decidedly not benign). The term has become almost meaningless due to its association with those confused and those lacking any degree of depth of real insight and understanding. Sort of like “Tantra.” What a travesty the current understanding of that word is.

Back to the point: let us not forget that in the vast expanse of time in which the Work unfolds (not to deny the possibility of valid, full awakening in one lifetime, but hey, do the math), that in 100 years our personal discomforts and crises will pale compared to the potentially ongoing divorce between earnest, true-hearted seekers and the Path.

OK, mind-fuckers, bring on the hair-splitting philosophizing.

21 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I appreciated your post, but the last sentence ruined it for me. Was that really necessary to encourage our feedback.

Friday, 22 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was with you until you said 'Back to the point'. What are you trying to say? I don't follow your last paragraph.

Friday, 22 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Loved your front page highlighted post and agree that one's disillusionment in man{may it be teacher, guru, lama, priest, etc} can sever us from the Path itself which is a tragedy if we allow it. Should we leave our Path, we leave behind our own true-self inquiry and transformational possibilities.

We must remain centered within ourselves and not put our faith in man, but God.

I also agree with you that no abuses of any kind are ever acceptable. Our world is full on this denial and has such a difficult time facing the truth about abuses, cruelty, sadism, etc.

You truly made me think, and I thank you.

Friday, 22 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You speak as if you are a representative of “the Work,” “the Path itself,” and “all true self-inquiry and transformational possibilities” to “mind-fuckers” who miss the point and indulge in “hair-splitting philosophizing.”

Are you a Cohen-LITE or Gurdjieff-LITE shepherd here to bring sheep who’ve lost “the Path” back into line?

You are correct when you say that there is such a thing as true crazy wisdom, but you are stuck in an anachronistic mindset if you think crazy wisdom is something that belongs to individuals, benign or pathological. The day of the patriarchal guru is over. The true crazy wisdom of today is the oftentimes chaotic (or “crazy”) self-regulating process of open feedback as it flows through, within, and between communities of passionate, autonomous individuals such as Hal and the many others who are moving beyond what has aptly been referred to here as the “shame-based spiritual striving” model Cohen represents.

Gurdjieff suggested that most people were entranced automatons controlled by mechanical habits of thought, perception, and behavior.

The myth this blog is evidence of the decline and fall of is the myth that there are autonomous individual human beings who are completely free of such sleepwalking at all times, to the point that they may remain forever aloof if not mechanically shielded from collective feedback about their speech acts and behavior. The sovereign king and his subjects guru-student model is dead. The king’s head has been cut off. The only mind-fuckers who miss the point are those who cannot see and accept this and who fear the chaotic crazy wisdom of open-feedback systems. Ken Wilber and Cohen are dinosaurs.

Friday, 22 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

To previous poster,
How I wish Freebird were back right now. She always calmed things down with her love posts.

The front page poster is clearly not for Andrew Cohen nor endorses any teacher. You are missing the point. He states that the only Path is a path of self-inquiry with possible tranformations and not to depend nor rely on any guru, teacher, etc., who when teachers fall from grace and leave the students devastated, many students may end up leaving their devoted Path because of the guru's downfall. He says no matter what stay true to your Path.

My only shock of the front page poster was his ending sentence which I will not repeat. Why the poster needed to end in such a way is a puzzle. Would you kindly enlighten us as to why you ended as you did. Thank you

Friday, 22 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Agreed Cohen and Wibler are stuck in the 20th century.

Craig T

Friday, 22 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

To previous poster,
The front page poster is clearly not for Andrew Cohen nor endorses any teacher. You are missing the point. He states that the only Path is a path of self-inquiry with possible tranformations and not to depend nor rely on any guru, teacher, etc., who when teachers fall from grace and leave the students devastated, many students may end up leaving their devoted Path because of the guru's downfall. He says no matter what stay true to your Path.


I'm the previous poster and I got exactly the point you explained. Of course the author of "Missing THE POINT" is not for Cohen, but I see the kind of thinking characteristic of those who buy into gurucentric models of shame-based spiritual striving in the author's words, and I will explain how I see this.

The author wrote: Of course it is human tendency to assume all spiritual teachers are bad, are psychotic, just because of the prominence of so many public scandals.

This suggests to me that the author is not even considering any number of spiritual teachers whose reputations are anything but "bad," such as Pema Chodron, Jack Kornfield, Stephen Levine, A.H. Almaas, John Welwood, Steve Hagen, Charlotte Joko Beck, former Cohen student Susan Bridle's Zen teacher, and many others.

But let's read on. The author says: When one is disillusioned by his or her teacher, yes, often one must come to terms with both one’s grief and remorse and also with their own naiveté, confusion, false expectations and projections, transference and dependencies, but these things can be resolved with competent help and a healing and nurturing environment. But when one’s disillusionment severs them from the Path itself, from all true self-inquiry and transformational possibilities, that is the greater tragedy.

So far so good. I have no argument with this at all. However, this passage comes between the previous statement about "the human tendency to assume all spiritual teachers are bad, are psychotic, just because of the prominence of so many public scandals" and the next line in the author's post, which is: There is such a thing as true crazy wisdom...

The author qualifies this by stating that this term has been misused and abused, etc., but then the author comes "back to the point," which is that "in 100 years our personal discomforts and crises will pale compared to the potentially ongoing divorce between earnest, true-hearted seekers and the Path."

The author is obviously referring at least in part to the "personal discomforts and crises" of those who've written about their negative experiences with Andrew Cohen.

The author is clearly saying that just because a specific teacher such as Andrew Cohen who abuses the term "crazy wisdom" undergoes a "fall from grace" does not mean that one should abandon "the Path" or "the Work."

But I infer that the author is saying more than that. I infer that the author is implying that there exist "true crazy wisdom" teachers and that just because one has come across one bad teacher is no reason to abandon the "true Path" that entails submission to "true" crazy wisdom teachers.

The term "crazy wisdom" is meant to refer to something, not to an abstraction. The term "crazy wisdom" is mean to refer to teachers who are "crazy wisdom teachers."

The author mentions Gurdjieff: It is also true, at least if one subscribes to the wisdom of Gurdjieff, that all issues of the well being of the individual, as vital to health and harmony as they may be, are secondary to the issues of the well being of the Work as a whole.

Gurdjieff is often considered a "crazy wisdom" type teacher (see Holy Madness by Georg Feuerstein).

Note that the author says that "the well being of the individual" is "secondary to the issues of the well being of the Work as a whole."

Here the author speaks as if people exist for "the Work" rather than the other way around. This is a variation on Cohen-speak, where something of "relative" value is place below something of "Absolute" value, or where the "personal" is devalued while the "impersonal" is placed upon a pedestal.

Notice that the author a priori undermined everything I've just said when the author ended his or her post by saying, "OK, mind-fuckers, bring on the hair-splitting philosophizing." This is a move akin to Cohen's move that makes a priori identifies any complaints about Cohen's behavior as "egoic resistance."

Perhaps the author will tell us if he or she believes that there is any place in today's world for "true crazy wisdom" teachers to whom students must blindly submit on faith that whatever the teacher might do that offends them is for the student's own good. That is the crazy wisdom teaching model. Marpa says build a house, then Marpa says tear it down and build a new one, and don't question me because I'm the true crazy wisdom master.

An ex-disciple of Gurdjieff named Paul Serant wrote: It is evident that if one holds the view that all men are machines, but that one is oneself beginning to no longer be a machine, a dangerous temptation arises: if others are machines, why not use them as such? Duplicity then becomes a quite legitimate means to an even keener consciousness of self.

It is then that a kind of spiritual inversion takes place that is infinitely more dangerous than immorality acknowledged as such.

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here are two essays that may be worth book marking and adding to the site library:

http://deikman.com/eval.html

and

http://www.fwbo-files.com/CofC.htm#Outline

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have an idea...

Why don't we just condemn Cohen, as a David Koresh and Jim Jones type, poisoning and misguiding people, report him to the authorities, call the editors of the New York Times and whatever else we think is fit, take him to court, charged with abuse and be done with the whole thing. How about it Hally, Hal (haven't heard form you for awhile), or Helene (who are you, anyway)? Then, we can all get on with our petty lives and stop wasting so much valuable time debating whatever it is we are or aren't debating on these blogs (blobs, I say). Are you all so bored with your lives that you have to keep going on and on about all of this stuff.

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous just another "blobber" said...

The previous "anonymous" wrote:

I have an idea...

Why don't we just condemn Cohen, as a David Koresh and Jim Jones type, poisoning and misguiding people, report him to the authorities, call the editors of the New York Times and whatever else we think is fit, take him to court, charged with abuse and be done with the whole thing.


Nobody here has compared Cohen to Koresh or Jim Jones--although given the proof submitted on this blog from numerous named and reliable sources as to the physical abuse, financial and psychological manipulation, and the fear, guilt and shame tactics used by Cohen at his Foxhollow compound and elsewhere, a cogent argument could be made that he is certainly heading very rapidly and determinedly in that direction.

The virulent tone of some of the recent posts on this blog condemning it and its contributors appears to indicate a heightening of fear and paranoia in Cohen's circles. Definitely a recipe for disaster, if history tells us anything.

Maybe some of the previous poster's suggestions--going to the press, investigating the abuses shown here and more recent ones that are likely to be occurring, and taking legal action, where appropriate--should be seriously considered, both for the good of Foxhollow compound inmates and the innocent unwary public.

Maybe the previous defender of Cohen does have a good idea after all.

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Please front page poster come forward since your post is so challenging, and let us know if we are right or wrong in our interpretations of same.

First of all you have taken everything all of us have said at one time or another and rolled it together into a wool ball, then you unravelled it to enlighten us with the truths of what is real in our expressions from your perspective of the Work and the Path.

In ending you stress the constant pull of the dualities encountered in our lives and also the difficulty of ever awakening because of that constant fluctuations of life itself and, gave us a gift by stressing the importance of never leaving our Path, we must be brave soldiers to remain true and faithful to the Work and Path at all costs. Many divorce from same because of disappointments and the loss of faith in earthly man. Let nothing disturb us, let nothing affright us, all passes away and in the end it is us alone as a solitary walker not depending on any broad gate.

In the end of our lives what is real and true is our Path with God totally living for God in and through Him, without any attachments to glitz, gllamour or another person. We have everything by staying true if we do not divorce from our Path, If so, we have absolutely nothing. Let the world disappear as we embrace God as The One.

I live alone and a life in solitude. The other night I said" Lord who is it that I wish would be with me right now of all the people I love and have ever loved" The answer came: You have everyone with you by loving me, God, and have never at any time lost anyone".

Tammuz

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Blogger www.strippingthegurus.com said...

Re: Marpa and "true crazy wisdom."

Stephen Butterfield, a former follower of the "authentic crazy wisdom master" Chögyam Trungpa, made the following observation in his spiritual autobiography (The Double Mirror: A Skeptical Journey into Buddhist Tantra):

"Chögyam Trungpa wrote that Marpa, the tenth-century Tibetan guru, 'lost his temper and beat people.' Marpa is also considered an incarnate Buddha, the spiritual father of Tibet's greatest yogi Milarepa. Maybe his beatings were compassion in disguise, but it is hard to understand why the same argument could not be made for the drunk who abuses his wife and children."

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

We forget. We never leave "the path" and if we could just remember there was and never will be any separation there is no problem!

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Why don't we just condemn Cohen, as a David Koresh and Jim Jones type, poisoning and misguiding people, report him to the authorities, call the editors of the New York Times and whatever else we think is fit, take him to court, charged with abuse and be done with the whole thing.

Because the whole thing is not just about Andrew Cohen.

The Cohen issue is the micro level issue. The macro level issue is about a “political” conflict taking place along a continuum where at one pole we find spiritual authoritarianism, at the other spiritual deep democracy, with various shades in the middle.

What Cohen, Koresh, and Jones (both Jim and Franklin) have in common is that they are all closer to the spiritual authoritarianism pole of the continuum.

This is the model where the teacher implicitly or explicitly communicates the following message:

"There exists a hierarchy of consciousness. I am high on this hierarchy. I am higher than you. I'm enlightened and you're not. Only those at my level can appreciate my behavior and speech acts at the level from which they emanate, while those at lower levels may easily misunderstand my behaviors and speech acts to be rooted in egocentricity and neurosis rather that compassion and an absolute relationship to life. Therefore, my students must question only themselves and must turn all doubts about me, my behavior, my speech acts, and my teachings, back onto themselves. Students who doubt me are caugth in egoic resistance to the very process of transformation itself. Therefore, those who leave me have simply fled from the fire of living Truth. There is nothing I can say to them to disabuse them of their illusions, and so I say nothing to those who leave and then in Judas-like fashion, attack me."

Let's say that John Doe embraces this model and he reads Susan Bridle's post here, titled, “A Legacy of Scorched Earth: Reflections of a former student,” (Wednesday, February 02, 2005), where she recalls her life as a Cohen student and shares that she presently studies with Danan Henry Roshi at the Zen Center of Denver.

She says, “It’s sooo different from Andrew’s community. Much more spacious, much more respectful of the individual, definitely not authoritarian. I’m finding my way with having a completely different, non-guru-like relationship with my spiritual guide.”

John Doe reads this and because his allegiance lies with spiritual authoritarianism, he automatically concludes that Susan has fled from the "fire" of the "Rude Boy" into the arms of a "comforting" and "consoling" teacher who probably has the "disease" Ken Wilber calls "boomeritis Buddhism."

But anyone who reads Susan's post can see that she has actually gone deeper into the fire of transformation, and has outgrown the parent-child teacher-student spiritual authoritarianism mode Cohen offers.

Those whose allegiance lies with the spiritual authoritarianism model are reactionaries. If this were the late 18th century in Colonialist America, they would be Tories, loyal to the King. They are loyal to the King and to the model of the guru as sovereign absolute monarch. They are stuck in the past and like professional reactionary Ann Coulter they defend their retrogresive values by attacking everyone who has exceeded these quaint values.

The alternative to the spiritual authoritarianism model is not "boomeritis" spirituality, but is deep democracy, where teachers do not isolate and insulate themselves from an open flow of feedback within their teaching systems as Cohen has done. Jack Kornfield, as one example, does not have "boomeritis" (though a reactionary bitch might say that), and no one can possibly suggest that sitting for a five-week meditation retreat with Kornfield is "comforting" or "consoling." If one wants to know where the money comes from and goes in the Spirit Rock Meditation Center which Kornfield founded, one can look at the annual report that always includes a pie chart that accounts for every cent of income and expenditure. If there is a problem with a teacher at Spirit Rock this is never ignored but always addressed openly and at the level of community. Only a reactionary would call this "boomeritis." No, this is deep democracy and it is a developmental advance over the antiquated spiritual authoritarianism model Cohen represents.

Because of the micro and macro issue here, there are some who remain aligned with the spiritual authoritarianism model and who see the problem only at the mirco level as being with Cohen, as if a more benign king would be just fine. Others, like myself, see the problem with Cohen but feel that the very model he represents is an anachronism, regardless of whether or not the king is benign or pathological. And reactionaries, such as Ken Wilber and Cohen, attempt to defend their attachment to the antiquated spiritual authoritarian model by accusing people like myself of being caught in "boomeritis" and of having some fear of hierarchy. This is ironic, because I very much believe in hierarchy and think the model Wilber and Cohen embrace is rather low on the hierarchy. In their terms it's not "second-tier," it's "blue."

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Great post, ! for anyone who understands Spiral dynamics think very carefully about placing Cohen (and Wilber in the area of his ethical development) in blue.

Craig T

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here is Ken Wilbers own discription of blue ;----

Blue: Mythic Order . Life has meaning, direction, and purpose, with outcomes determined by an all-powerful Other or Order. This righteous Order enforces a code of conduct based on absolutist and unvarying principles of "right" and "wrong." Violating the code or rules has severe, perhaps everlasting repercussions. Following the code yields rewards for the faithful. Basis of ancient nations . Rigid social hierarchies; paternalistic; one right way and only one right way to think about everything. Law and order; impulsivity controlled through guilt; concrete-literal and fundamentalist belief; obedience to the rule of Order; strongly conventional and conformist. Often "religious" or "mythic" [in the mythic-membership sense; Graves and Beck refer to it as the "saintly/absolutistic" level], but can be secular or atheistic Order or Mission.

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

One more time:

To Heal One is To Heal All
by anonymous

I extend my respects, and my ever-breaking heart, to the contributors of this blog. To those who are suffering, to those who are healing and thriving. . .and to Andrew, and to his serious and dedicated students who pour out their hearts’ sincerity and the depth of longing into what they hope to be the greatest possibility for their lifetime. None of us is so different from each other, blind but sincere voyagers on this Ship of Fools.

I am not a student of Andrew, but have followed his work for many years, and have received teachings from him on more than one occasion that were of valuable help to my sadhana. I would like to share a precious teaching lesson Andrew once offered me, and with open hands and heart offer it back to him in return.

Many years ago, as a young practitioner on the path, I visited Andrew. At the time I was like many of us, totally ambitious, totally naïve, believing that my wish for Truth was greater than the others, that I was destined for spiritual greatness, that I was, somehow, special. Surely many of us can admit to such a feeling, if only in the privacy of our hearts? That is why Hafiz wrote, “But still God is delighted and amused, you once tried to be a saint.”

Though I believed nothing could come between myself and the most radical and uncompromised truth, I was struggling with a broken practice, with resistance.
I shyly raised me hand, “Andrew, how do I work with the great NO inside of me? How do I overcome this tremendous resistance to practice that keeps me from Truth?”

“Give me an example, Andrew flashed back, playful suspicion in his eyes. “Tell me how this great NO shows up in practical terms.”

I told him of my fall from grace earlier that day, which amounted to a breach of practice so minor as to be perceptible only to myself.

“Oh my God!” Andrew theatrically jumped in, laughing, instantly disarming my self-seriousness and grandiosity. “Did you hear that?” he turned to his students.

“Listen, sweetie,” he turned to me with the piercing swords of discernment, the mood instantly changed. “You’re young, you’re serious and you are just beginning. On this path you are going to make a LOT of mistakes, and some of those mistakes are going to be BIG ones. Everybody does. It is guaranteed. Save your energy and remorse for the big mistakes because you are going to make them and you are going to need your energy to get through them. Got it?”

I think we all got it in that moment, the inevitability of a fall I could not imagine, the humanness of it, the humility of it, and the need to show up as a true spiritual warrior when the time would come.

It is 10 years later. Andrew has made some big mistakes. Some of the ones he said we would all make. The accrual of casualties in terms of the abuse of money, power, and emotional manipulatin, just to name a few of the “crimes of unconsciousness,” are undeniable.

It is a precious moment. What appears to be a devastating shock can become a healing crisis if it is related to with deep courage. A doorway is open that may not stay open for too long. It is a moment in which Andrew can use the fruits of his sadhana, the energy that he still has accumulated, to gracefully work his way through his present predicament. This is the moment in his own life that he was telling me about, one of the BIG mistakes, in which we cash in some of our hard-earned accumulation of energy in order to create a significant healing and transformation.

People can be tremendously resilient and forgiving. When approached from the humility of true remorse and heartbreak, and the admission of human error, hearts open and karma is undone.

Those hurt by Andrew were, of course, mutually complicit in the drama they were a part of. Our neurotic wounds and needs unconsciously kidnap the teachings in service of themselves, and so both neurosis of teacher and student were feeding off each other. This is an inevitable symptom of the times we are in, times of great possibility and a time in which our collective psychological wounding has penetrated to such a collective and epidemic level that none us, including teachers, are immune from its influence. The question is, “Can we work our way out of it?” If we really believe in evolution, this is the humble domain in which it is learned and lived.

Many years ago, Claudio Naranjo, after being fully enlightened for three years, running a thriving spiritual community, came to the stark realization and admission that his enlightenment was not complete. In spite of protests from his students, he dismantled his organization and dethroned himself as guru. He later explained that his own enlightenment had to be sacrificed in order to illuminate that which was still dark within him.

A friend of mine was a very close student of Yogi Amrit Desai. In fact, she was one of those who sued him for his sex scandals (enacted on her) and won the lawsuit. Much later, they did mediation together. Eventually, therapy. Many years later she returned to him as his student, and they now have a mature, thriving, adult relationship as guru and disciple. Corruption and transmission can coexist! Change is possible. Forgiveness is possible.

Let us remember that none of us are beyond falling. Most of us have not been given enough power, authority and fame to fully appreciate the subtlety and pulls of its temptations. We actually cannot know that we would not do as Andrew has done, given the complexity of historical and karmic factors he faces. Most of us have not penetrated the subtleties of dharmic wisdom deeply enough to fully appreciate the degree to which the still unconscious aspects of ego can co-opt Truth into a sterling silver layer of armor and defense, all flawlessly justifiable in the language of Truth itself. Most of us are not beyond falling into the traps that Andrew has fallen into.

However, as a world teacher and model, Andrew is now in an incredible position to offer us an extremely potent teaching lesson about how an authentic teacher can allow himself to become dismantled and dethroned in order to assume the true throne of Disciple of Truth, of Love, of Life. Through his own umcompromised practice, Andrew could, through an essential and brave gesture, undergo the greatest teaching lesson of his own life - turning toward EVERYTHING that is within him, including deep psychological wounds and their consequences, humility, hurt, blindness, in order to demonstrate to all of us that a true visionary will stop short of nothing in his journey to Truth, even the dethroning of his own empire. I envision that the humility of such an action would invoke the forgiveness and support of all of those who, in their heart of hearts, still love him. Things that may still be to come, lawsuits, more difficult books, this blog, could be dropped, forgiven, erased, and even transformed into the fruition of a still greater truth.

I am sure the Gods would sing. The great gurus would arise from their cremated ashes and bestow blessings, forgiveness, the undoing of karma, and true praise for an act of such human bravery. The hearts of present and former disciples would be disarmed in the beauty of Andrew’s humility, and something deep within them could forgive, let go, and all of us could learn something painfully deep and humanly real about the teaching that “there is no other.”

Andrew, you offered me that precious lesson long ago: “Save yourself for the big mistakes because you are going to make them and you are going to need your energy to get through them.” Now demonstrate to all of us how it is done, so when our time comes we will have the courage to do the same.

With All Respects

Saturday, 23 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Appreciation for the re-posting of To Heal One is to Heal All. This touches deeply into the heart. The point here is that it is still not too late for a healing and transformative response from Cohen.
The generosity and bigheartedness expressed here is a healing message to my own reactivity and my own wounds. Thank you.

That articles like To Heal One, and the recent Missing The Point, show me how vital and alive WE is. I am grateful to all who have given so much to bring light into a difficult and dark corner.

Sunday, 24 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

to the previous poster, are disagreeing with the fact that the person previous to you got some benefit from a posting here? This makes no sense since it is statement of their own experience. Or if you're just making another tiresome complaint about the running of this blog, why not just leave or start your own. These meta comments are not the point or helpful to discussions here. As far as I can tell, the reference point for discussions is the revealing, tryimg to understand and healing from guru Cohen's uncontested abuses of his students.

Monday, 25 April, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If i hear or read the word 'path' one more time i will pull my pubes out. There is so much parroting of realisers going on it is sickening. What path? What God?
Death is certain and nothing else.
All the rest is philosophy, which on my death bed wont mean shit.
There are actually real Masters existing and humility and Grace alone will lead to one. "im on my Spiritual Path and it is so wonderful". Less religious belief (and it doesnt matter if it buddhist) and more real accessing of the situation is required i think. LOVE?

Thursday, 27 October, 2005  
Anonymous Rebecca Saxon said...

Why is everyone so Anonymous? What are you afraid of by saying your name? What have you to hide and from whom?

Wednesday, 11 August, 2010  

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